Beers (late 19th Century and 20th Century)

Get advice on making beer from raw ingredients (malt, hops, water and yeast)
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Cobnut
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Re: Beers (late 19th Century and 20th Century)

Post by Cobnut » Tue Aug 02, 2022 10:09 am

I had another go at the Durden Park Beer Circle's "favourite" beer - the 1850 Whitbread London Porter.

It was fermented and casked before Christmas 2021 being targeted for serving from a pin at the Inaugural Ipswich Homebrew festival (viewtopic.php?f=21&t=83859) which was held on Saturday 30th July. So it had seven months maturation time (no priming sugar). There was sufficient left for me to bottle 1 x 500ml and 1 x 330ml (both now drunk too).

I was rather pleased with how it came out; luscious mouthfeel (from the Chevallier malt), rich moussy tan head which lasted most of the way down the glass, rather roasty and still quite bitter from the combination of the 5.5% black malt and about 160g Fuggle-esque hops boiled for 90 mins.

I loved it, but I do think it would be even better after a year or more in cask.

And based on the previous version I made where I aged some of the batch in Oak, I reckon oak aging it would take some of the harsher edges off it too.

Definitely on my list to re-brew. I would consider either reducing the % of black malt or perhaps capping the mash with the black malt so as to get the bulk of the colour with much less of the harsh bitterness which it can contribute. It might mean it could be drunk sooner.
Fermenting: nowt
Conditioning: nowt
Drinking: Endavour Pale Ale, Store cupboard Stout, Partigyled IDSP (& PP - now drunk), London Porter, De Koninck Belgian Pale Ale, Adnams Broadside Clone (not!), dodgy London Pride clone
Planning: Brut IPA #2, Hazelweiss 2022 edition, Simmonds Bitter, and more!

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PeeBee
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Re: Beers (late 19th Century and 20th Century)

Post by PeeBee » Tue Aug 02, 2022 12:37 pm

Moving on from Hanson's 1898 XX (Mild Ale) my next brew (also unearthed by Ron Pattinson) is >Boddington's 1901 Stout<. I used Chevallier barley malt for most of the base "pale malt", but diluted with over a third Vienna Malt (8EBC, Crisp's "Vienna" is the same as their "Mild Ale Malt). I also used S-33 instead of WYeast #1318 London Ale III (I don't know why Ron insists on using #1318 as "Boddington's" yeast when it's widely published that it's an American fallacy ... I probably do know; it's a case of "knowing which side your bread is buttered on" ... or perhaps there is another reason?). Anyway, here it is and there is a very good reason it's taken indoors (apart from it raining outside!):
20220801_212858_WEB.jpg
20220801_212858_WEB.jpg (120.11 KiB) Viewed 110 times
Oh, pizza night, lucky me!

Hand-pulled. Contains emulated invert sugars (formulated from Billington sugars, sucrose based), but this isn't a comparison because no-one makes "No.4" invert sugar to compare with. But the black colour comes from the sugar, the tiny amount of black malt only helps. And the reason it's indoors; I'm really lying about it being black! A dark brown perhaps? Doesn't look very "stout-like" outdoors. Ron Pattinson describes it as being more like a "porter" and I'm certainly not arguing! I didn't boil the black malt as Boddington's did; my water is playing about again (mash pH5.8!) and adding it to the mash got it down to 5.7 (Note: you shouldn't normally use one of the high alkalinity "stout/porter" water profiles when holding back the roast malts from the mash).

Not remarkable. But a pleasant enough beer. The "raw sugar" flavours don't appear to dominate or be "masking" like I worried they might be (but remember it took me 30-40 years to recognise treacle and molasses were doing that to my "OP" clones). But there is a hint of dark sugar "lushness", but how authentic this is would be anybody's guess ... I'd have expected the original (Victorian) No.4 Invert Sugar to have been pretty rough (given the raw materials they might deal with). If you want roast grain flavours in your "stout" you don't want this recipe! And it's certainly not hoppy, inside "Mild" territory, but this seemed to be the way for provincial beers. Perhaps describe this beer as a very dark bitter?

Cask-conditioned style ale out of a keg/Cornie (the "treatise"): https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwzEv5 ... rDKRMjcO1g
FIXED 31/1/2022 !

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PeeBee
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Re: Beers (late 19th Century and 20th Century)

Post by PeeBee » Wed Aug 03, 2022 10:32 am

Cobnut wrote:
Tue Aug 02, 2022 10:09 am
I had another go at the Durden Park Beer Circle's "favourite" beer - the 1850 Whitbread London Porter. ...
Hi Cobnut. Good to hear from you! I'd wondered what happened to your Porter; last post I'd seen it was redecorating your room 'cos you'd tapped it when still a tad "lively"! [EDIT: That took a bit of finding ... this was it, eh, I think? Historic Porter's, Stouts and Milds - Brewing Methods]

That 1850 period was the reason I split my "historical" posts in the 19th century. Too much going on to keep up continuity in the thread. I was pondering that period earlier this year (and no doubt you'd seen it): Ales and Beers (17th, 18th and a bit of 19th Century) - Page 5.

I was intending to have another crack at that mid-century Whitbread Porter for this coming Christmas, but never got around to it. It was going to be "Bretted" and blended with "mild" version to try and get more authenticity, plus adapt my brown malts to be more like period (it would have been "higher-dried" by then, darker, and not diastatic). Apparently (I'm possibly mis-interpreting Ron Pattinson here who's been digging up a lot of stuff on brown malt recently) they may have introduced mesh cylinders in the kilns to make the job of turning the malt at higher temperature tolerable, more consistent, and less of a risk of burning the malt house down.

They were still not finishing in the new-fangled rotating cylinder kilns (which produce modern brown malt) but may have used them for a part of the kilning. The wire drums may still have been operation after WWI, but Porter had long given up its ground to "Mild Ales".

"Emulating" all that was way too much work for me right now. So, I have mucked about emulating "Invert Sugars" (which makes up most of this thread) and have a go at these provincial recipes like that "Boddington's 1901 Stout" above. They even had the audacity to call it "stout". Didn't contain any brown malt either, probably because all the provincial malt-houses had burnt down! I have got an 18th century "Stitch ale" (100% diastatic brown malt and drunk young or "mild") planned for this coming Christmas though.

Cask-conditioned style ale out of a keg/Cornie (the "treatise"): https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwzEv5 ... rDKRMjcO1g
FIXED 31/1/2022 !

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