which water filter

(That's water to the rest of us!) Beer is about 95% water, so if you want to discuss water treatment, filtering etc this is the place to do it!
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likesbeer

which water filter

Post by likesbeer » Fri Mar 19, 2010 6:39 pm

I'm getting close to finishing the shed and thinking of water hook up (electrics this weekend).
I currently brew from either boiled up tap water or filtered throught a jug type filter and would like to fit an in-line type unit.
Only really want to remove the chlorine parts as the rest doesnt seem to have caused an issue so far so why break what isnt broken, plus not planning to get heavily into water treatments.
Any suggestions on a cheap and simple system with a reasonable flow rate as the choice is rather baffling?
Plus from reading the threads below their seems to be loads of different ways people do it.

The inline type of jug filter generally seems to come with a tap to put onto your sink rather than just inline in some 15mm pipe, help please!

Thanks

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jubby
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Re: which water filter

Post by jubby » Wed Mar 24, 2010 10:30 am

I use one of these: http://www.pozzani.co.uk/water-filters- ... eqv7t0ttv7 with a BC600 carbon filter cartridge which removes heavy metals, pesticides and chlorine. There are loads of other makes out there though, Hop & Grape do one, but it looks a bit weedy. As you say, they seem to come with taps, but if you contacted Pozzani, i'm sure they would sell you the cartridge assembly only. Whatever you decide, be sure to research your filter type as some will remove more than you want. The BC600 cartridge i mention is a basic carbon filter which removes the bad stuff, but keeps the good.
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leewink

Re: which water filter

Post by leewink » Tue Apr 20, 2010 1:35 am

The BC600 cartridge i mention is a basic carbon filter which removes the bad stuff, but keeps the good.
I think you'll find yeast totally relies on metals to thrive, and even so, how can you add the right amount back after stripping it ?

I use the following and would suggest, good ole tap water, a campden crushed tablet to remove chlorine and a half teaspoon of ph 5.2 balance, its easy and needs no skill to use, balances the mash perfectly.

Just mix your total liquor the night before, dont even need to boil it.

I've had the discussion on here before, you could get a water report and try to GUESS the additions of various potions, i say guess, because every water report has a yearly swing of upto 20%, so how can you make a solid calculation on that ? knowing that next week or so, your water WILL have totally changed in its make up.

On this, I cannot suggest adding 4.212g of this or 5.824g of that either, because again, your water is changing minutely daily, you can go all "techie" and do it properly, but I can tell you, your gonna need many thousands of pounds worth of lab monitoring gear to get any sort of happy CONSISTENT result, or have a sealed massive water container and treat one lot at a time, again using lab gear to get it perfect, its beer, get it close and have fun.

I have gone on a bit here, but water filter jugs, RO/DI systems and even carbon filters do far too much for what we need here, if your happy to use them go for it, i'd leave them on the shelf.

lee

boingy

Re: which water filter

Post by boingy » Tue Apr 20, 2010 6:53 am

leewink wrote: I have gone on a bit here...
:whistle: :whistle: :whistle: :whistle: :whistle:

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Aleman
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Re: which water filter

Post by Aleman » Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:51 pm

leewink wrote:I use the following and would suggest, good ole tap water, a campden crushed tablet to remove chlorine and a half teaspoon of ph 5.2 balance, its easy and needs no skill to use, balances the mash perfectly.
Not mine . . . and not several brewers on here either! I've run 100% all pale malt mashes with pH 5.2 additions of 1/2tsp through to 4tsp and while it did lower my mash pH it was from 5.8 down to 5.65 . . . while that is good enough to brew . . . Ysuing calcium chloride and calcium sulphate additions I got 5.25 to 5.4 which is a damn siget closer tot he optimum.
leewink wrote:I've had the discussion on here before, you could get a water report and try to GUESS the additions of various potions, i say guess, because every water report has a yearly swing of upto 20%, so how can you make a solid calculation on that ? knowing that next week or so, your water WILL have totally changed in its make up.
In the majority of cases even when an water company draws from a different source the make up will rarely totally change. . . Brewing is Bucket chemistry and to be quite frank a difference of 20% is very minor when the process is looked at like that. Especially if you spend 7 quid on an alkalinity test kit (the most important value to measure) and measure/adjust it before brewing.
leewink wrote:On this, I cannot suggest adding 4.212g of this or 5.824g of that either, because again, your water is changing minutely daily, you can go all "techie" and do it properly, but I can tell you, your gonna need many thousands of pounds worth of lab monitoring gear to get any sort of happy CONSISTENT result, or have a sealed massive water container and treat one lot at a time, again using lab gear to get it perfect
Hardly thousands of pounds, I use 2 Salifert kits to measure alkalinity and calcium which cost under 15 quid. With them I can adjust my mash pH (via the alkalinity) and calcium levels consistently . . . everything else is very minor and more than that is not required.

Water treatment is simple. Get the alkalinity in the right ballpark for the beer you are brewing, and ensure you have enough calcium by throwing a tsp of either/or gypsum/calcium chloride into the mash and boil
leewink wrote:its beer, get it close and have fun.
;)

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Re: which water filter

Post by timbobist » Fri Jan 17, 2014 2:16 pm

jubby wrote:I use one of these: http://www.pozzani.co.uk/water-filters- ... eqv7t0ttv7 with a BC600 carbon filter cartridge which removes heavy metals, pesticides and chlorine. There are loads of other makes out there though, Hop & Grape do one, but it looks a bit weedy. As you say, they seem to come with taps, but if you contacted Pozzani, i'm sure they would sell you the cartridge assembly only. Whatever you decide, be sure to research your filter type as some will remove more than you want. The BC600 cartridge i mention is a basic carbon filter which removes the bad stuff, but keeps the good.
Do you treat your water in any other way before brewing or just use the water straight from the filter?

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Re: which water filter

Post by chrisjordan » Thu Jul 15, 2021 1:22 pm

I believe you'll discover that yeast is completely reliant on metals to survive, but how can you reintroduce the proper quantity after removing it?

I use and recommend the following: good old tap water, a crushed campden pill to eliminate chlorine, and a half teaspoon of ph 5.2 balance, which is simple to apply and requires no talent, and properly balances the mash.

You don't even need to boil your entire liquor the night before.

You could acquire a water report and try to GUESS the additions of various potions, I say guess since every water report has a yearly fluctuation of up to 20%, so how can you build a good calculation on that? knowing that your water will be turned off in the coming week or so

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